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19 product(s) found in Brass Band - Composer - Philip Harper
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Kingdom of Dragons The ‘Kingdom of Dragons’ is Gwent in South Wales, known in ancient times as the Kingdom of Gwent, and more recently home to the Newport Gwent Dragons Rugby Union team.

This piece was commissioned by the Gwent Music Service with additional funding from Ty Cerdd - Music Centre Wales to celebrate the 50th anniversary in 2010 of the formation of the Gwent Youth Brass Band.

Although the music is continuous, it is divided into four distinct sections, each one representing one of the unitary authorities which make up the County of Gwent.

I. Monmouthshire, which has a large number of ancient castles
II. Blaenau Gwent, an historic area of iron and coal mining
III. Torfaen, where Pontypool Park is a notable landmark
IV. Newport, the largest city in the region.

The music begins with a two-bar fanfare, which sets out all the thematic material of the piece. The mood of pageantry that follows describes some of the ancient castles in Monmouthshire, with rolling tenor drums and fanfaring cornets.
After a majestic climax the music subsides and quite literally descends into the coal mines of Blaenau Gwent. The percussion provides effects that suggest industrial machinery clanking into life, and the music accelerates to become a perilous white-knuckle ride on the underground railroad. There is a brief respite as a miner’s work-song is introduced and, after a protracted build-up, this is restated at fortissimo before the music comes crashing to an inglorious close, much like the UK’s mining industry itself.
The middle sonorities of the band portray the tranquillity of Pontypool Park, a place of great natural beauty. Brief cadenzas for cornet and euphonium lead to a full band reprise of the pastoral mood. At the end of this section we find ourselves at the top of the park’s ‘Folly Tower’ from which the distant castle turrets of Monmouthshire are visible.
Pontypool RFC was one of eleven clubs in the first Welsh league in 1881 and a brief but bruising musical portrayal of the formidable Pontypool front-row, the ‘Viet Gwent’ leads into the work’s final section. This portrays Newport, a symbol for progress and optimism for the future, ideals shared by the Gwent Youth Band itself. The music is a vigorous fugue which advances through various keys and episodes before the final triumphant augmented entry which brings the work to a magnificent conclusion.

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Percussion requirements: (3 players) Timpani, 2 Tenor Drums, 2 Tom toms, Snare Drum (sticks and brushes required), Bass Drum, Clash Cymbals, Suspended Cymbal, Hi-hat, Sizzle Cymbal, Tambourine, Metal block with metal beater (eg hammer), Rattle (eg football rattle), Glockenspiel, Xylophone

HARP 001-030 Kingdom of Dragons
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 86,95
Olympus Selected as the test-piece for the 3rd Section Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships 2012

The music begins with a depiction of the exciting Opening Ceremony where noisy fanfares and sudden swells add to the cosmopolitan flag-waving clamour. Without a break the music leads to The Chariot Race, a fast compound-time gallop with thundering hooves in the basses and percussion, and a heroic melody introduced by the tenor horns. Chariot racing was the main equestrian event in the Ancient Greek Games, which were founded in memory of King Oenomaus. In the Greek legend he suffered defeat in a chariot race to his son-in-law and Zeus’ grandson, Pelops, but much of the music is bitter-sweet to symbolise the fact that Pelops had to cheat to win – drawing parallels with some of the issues still facing modern-day athletics.

A slow, mystical passage follows, describing The Temple of Zeus at Olympia. The statue of Zeus, who was honoured throughout the Ancient Games’ history, was housed inside the temple and was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The music depicts this period of the dawn of one of mankind’s most ancient civilisations and there is a series of solo passages above a drone.

The next section is called The Olympic Flame and a broad and lyrical anthem-like melody develops slowly in the euphoniums, which gradually ascends until the horns can take it over before passing upwards again to the cornets (Higher). The music bursts into bright life at the lighting of the flame and the regular rhythmic pattern which has been established goes through an accelerando (Faster).

The final section is called The Olympic Truce and aims to capture the cooperative spirit of the ancient practice of ending wars for the duration of the games. The anthem-like melody makes an affirmatory return (Stronger) and the work ends as it began – with a blaze of colour and a real sense of optimism and global celebration.

“Citius, Altius, Fortius” (Faster, Higher, Stonger)

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Percussion requirements: 1 to 3 players (3 Timpani, Snare Drum, Tenor Drum, Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Triangle)

HARP 003-030 Olympus
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 79,95
Kingdom of Dragons The ‘Kingdom of Dragons’ is Gwent in South Wales, known in ancient times as the Kingdom of Gwent, and more recently home to the Newport Gwent Dragons Rugby Union team.

This piece was commissioned by the Gwent Music Service with additional funding from Ty Cerdd - Music Centre Wales to celebrate the 50th anniversary in 2010 of the formation of the Gwent Youth Brass Band.

Although the music is continuous, it is divided into four distinct sections, each one representing one of the unitary authorities which make up the County of Gwent.

I. Monmouthshire, which has a large number of ancient castles
II. Blaenau Gwent, an historic area of iron and coal mining
III. Torfaen, where Pontypool Park is a notable landmark
IV. Newport, the largest city in the region.

The music begins with a two-bar fanfare, which sets out all the thematic material of the piece. The mood of pageantry that follows describes some of the ancient castles in Monmouthshire, with rolling tenor drums and fanfaring cornets.
After a majestic climax the music subsides and quite literally descends into the coal mines of Blaenau Gwent. The percussion provides effects that suggest industrial machinery clanking into life, and the music accelerates to become a perilous white-knuckle ride on the underground railroad. There is a brief respite as a miner’s work-song is introduced and, after a protracted build-up, this is restated at fortissimo before the music comes crashing to an inglorious close, much like the UK’s mining industry itself.
The middle sonorities of the band portray the tranquillity of Pontypool Park, a place of great natural beauty. Brief cadenzas for cornet and euphonium lead to a full band reprise of the pastoral mood. At the end of this section we find ourselves at the top of the park’s ‘Folly Tower’ from which the distant castle turrets of Monmouthshire are visible.
Pontypool RFC was one of eleven clubs in the first Welsh league in 1881 and a brief but bruising musical portrayal of the formidable Pontypool front-row, the ‘Viet Gwent’ leads into the work’s final section. This portrays Newport, a symbol for progress and optimism for the future, ideals shared by the Gwent Youth Band itself. The music is a vigorous fugue which advances through various keys and episodes before the final triumphant augmented entry which brings the work to a magnificent conclusion.

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Percussion requirements: (3 players) Timpani, 2 Tenor Drums, 2 Tom toms, Snare Drum (sticks and brushes required), Bass Drum, Clash Cymbals, Suspended Cymbal, Hi-hat, Sizzle Cymbal, Tambourine, Metal block with metal beater (eg hammer), Rattle (eg football rattle), Glockenspiel, Xylophone

HARP 001-130 Kingdom of Dragons
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 36,95
The Mermaid of Zennor Commissioned by the Cornwall Youth Brass Band to mark its 60th Anniversary, with funds bequethed by Dennis Arbon This piece is inspired by an old Cornish folk-tale set in the village of Zennor on the coast of Cornwall, the most South-Westerly county of England. The music is in three sections: l. The Sea and Seafaring ll. At the Church ill. Return to the Waves
HARP 005-030 The Mermaid of Zennor
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 86,95
EMR1302 Horizon
Philip Harper | Editions Marc Reift | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 146,80
Olympus Selected as the test-piece for the 3rd Section Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships 2012

The music begins with a depiction of the exciting Opening Ceremony where noisy fanfares and sudden swells add to the cosmopolitan flag-waving clamour. Without a break the music leads to The Chariot Race, a fast compound-time gallop with thundering hooves in the basses and percussion, and a heroic melody introduced by the tenor horns. Chariot racing was the main equestrian event in the Ancient Greek Games, which were founded in memory of King Oenomaus. In the Greek legend he suffered defeat in a chariot race to his son-in-law and Zeus’ grandson, Pelops, but much of the music is bitter-sweet to symbolise the fact that Pelops had to cheat to win – drawing parallels with some of the issues still facing modern-day athletics.

A slow, mystical passage follows, describing The Temple of Zeus at Olympia. The statue of Zeus, who was honoured throughout the Ancient Games’ history, was housed inside the temple and was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The music depicts this period of the dawn of one of mankind’s most ancient civilisations and there is a series of solo passages above a drone.

The next section is called The Olympic Flame and a broad and lyrical anthem-like melody develops slowly in the euphoniums, which gradually ascends until the horns can take it over before passing upwards again to the cornets (Higher). The music bursts into bright life at the lighting of the flame and the regular rhythmic pattern which has been established goes through an accelerando (Faster).

The final section is called The Olympic Truce and aims to capture the cooperative spirit of the ancient practice of ending wars for the duration of the games. The anthem-like melody makes an affirmatory return (Stronger) and the work ends as it began – with a blaze of colour and a real sense of optimism and global celebration.

“Citius, Altius, Fortius” (Faster, Higher, Stonger)

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Percussion requirements: 1 to 3 players (3 Timpani, Snare Drum, Tenor Drum, Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Triangle)

HARP 003-130 Olympus
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 36,95
Willow Pattern Composed in 2009 for Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band

This piece tells the Willow Pattern legend through music. Several leitmotifs are used both for the different characters and also for some of the important emotions in the tale. Additionally, Knoon-se’s part is mainly played by the flugel horn, Chang by the euphonium, the Mandarin by the Eb Bass and the Duke Ta-jin by the trombone.

The Willow Pattern Legend
Once, in ancient China, there lived a wealthy and powerful Mandarin who had a beautiful daughter, Knoon-se. She had fallen in love with Chang, a humble accountant, which angered her father who imprisoned her in the Pavilion by the river with only the exotic birds for company. She learnt that the Mandarin planned to marry her to the pompous Duke Ta-jin and that the wedding would take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree, so she sent Chang a message: “Gather thy blossom, ere it be stolen”.
The Duke arrived by sea amid great fanfare when the tree was heavy with bud, and nights of magnificent banquets followed. After one such occasion when the Mandarin slept, Chang crept over the crooked fence and tiptoed into the Pavilion to rescue Knoon-se, but as they escaped the alarm was raised. They fled over the bridge with the Mandarin close on their heels brandishing his whip. They managed to escape by boat to a secluded island where they lived happily for a time. Meanwhile, the Mandarin learned of their refuge and, intent on revenge, he ordered his soldiers to kill them. As Knoon-se and Chang slept at night, the men set fire to the pagoda in which they lived and the lovers perished in the flames.
However, the Gods, moved by the lovers’ plight, transformed their souls into two turtle-doves which rose from the charred remains, soaring above the Earth, symbolising eternal happiness.

Willow Pattern is dedicated to the memory of Jean Harper who passed away as I was completing the piece and who was a great collector of porcelain and china-ware.

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Mute Requirements:
Metal mutes – soprano cornet, repiano cornet, 2nd cornets, 3rd cornets (6 in total)
Cup mutes – all cornets and trombones (10 + 3)
Harmon mutes – soprano cornet, solo cornets, repiano cornet (6)

Percussion Requirements:
There are two parts for percussion on the score. The minimum requirements are as follows:

2 players - Timpani, 2 Large tom toms, 2 Wood Blocks, Triangle, Sleigh Bells, Whip, Clash Cymbals, Suspended Cymbal, Hi-hat, Glockenspiel, Xylophone, Tam tam (or susp. cym.)

For performances with extra resources, and to achieve closer authenticity, the full requirements are as follows:

3 players - Timpani, 3 Taiko Drums played with thick wooden sticks (or Large tom toms), 2 Wood Blocks, Triangle, Chinese Bells (or Sleigh Bells), Whip, Clash Cymbals, Chinese Cymbals (small clash cymbals – approx 12”), Suspended Cymbal, Glockenspiel, Xylophone, Tam tam

HARP 002-030 Willow Pattern
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 86,95
The Divine Right At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new countrys people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.

My music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.

Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including my own, the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,

         a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.

The music descends to emptiness.

The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.

This defining episode in Englands history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:

         Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.

At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.

Philip Harper, 2013

HARP 004-030 The Divine Right
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 122,99
The Mermaid of Zennor Commissioned by the Cornwall Youth Brass Band to mark its 60th Anniversary, with funds bequethed by Dennis Arbon This piece is inspired by an old Cornish folk-tale set in the village of Zennor on the coast of Cornwall, the most South-Westerly county of England. The music is in three sections: l. The Sea and Seafaring ll. At the Church ill. Return to the Waves
HARP 005-130 The Mermaid of Zennor
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 36,95
The Divine Right At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new countrys people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.

My music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.

Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including my own, the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,

         a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.

The music descends to emptiness.

The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.

This defining episode in Englands history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:

         Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.

At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.

Philip Harper, 2013

HARP 004-130 The Divine Right
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 49,95
Willow Pattern Composed in 2009 for Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band

This piece tells the Willow Pattern legend through music. Several leitmotifs are used both for the different characters and also for some of the important emotions in the tale. Additionally, Knoon-se’s part is mainly played by the flugel horn, Chang by the euphonium, the Mandarin by the Eb Bass and the Duke Ta-jin by the trombone.

The Willow Pattern Legend
Once, in ancient China, there lived a wealthy and powerful Mandarin who had a beautiful daughter, Knoon-se. She had fallen in love with Chang, a humble accountant, which angered her father who imprisoned her in the Pavilion by the river with only the exotic birds for company. She learnt that the Mandarin planned to marry her to the pompous Duke Ta-jin and that the wedding would take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree, so she sent Chang a message: “Gather thy blossom, ere it be stolen”.
The Duke arrived by sea amid great fanfare when the tree was heavy with bud, and nights of magnificent banquets followed. After one such occasion when the Mandarin slept, Chang crept over the crooked fence and tiptoed into the Pavilion to rescue Knoon-se, but as they escaped the alarm was raised. They fled over the bridge with the Mandarin close on their heels brandishing his whip. They managed to escape by boat to a secluded island where they lived happily for a time. Meanwhile, the Mandarin learned of their refuge and, intent on revenge, he ordered his soldiers to kill them. As Knoon-se and Chang slept at night, the men set fire to the pagoda in which they lived and the lovers perished in the flames.
However, the Gods, moved by the lovers’ plight, transformed their souls into two turtle-doves which rose from the charred remains, soaring above the Earth, symbolising eternal happiness.

Willow Pattern is dedicated to the memory of Jean Harper who passed away as I was completing the piece and who was a great collector of porcelain and china-ware.

NOTES ON PERFORMANCE

Mute Requirements:
Metal mutes – soprano cornet, repiano cornet, 2nd cornets, 3rd cornets (6 in total)
Cup mutes – all cornets and trombones (10 + 3)
Harmon mutes – soprano cornet, solo cornets, repiano cornet (6)

Percussion Requirements:
There are two parts for percussion on the score. The minimum requirements are as follows:

2 players - Timpani, 2 Large tom toms, 2 Wood Blocks, Triangle, Sleigh Bells, Whip, Clash Cymbals, Suspended Cymbal, Hi-hat, Glockenspiel, Xylophone, Tam tam (or susp. cym.)

For performances with extra resources, and to achieve closer authenticity, the full requirements are as follows:

3 players - Timpani, 3 Taiko Drums played with thick wooden sticks (or Large tom toms), 2 Wood Blocks, Triangle, Chinese Bells (or Sleigh Bells), Whip, Clash Cymbals, Chinese Cymbals (small clash cymbals – approx 12”), Suspended Cymbal, Glockenspiel, Xylophone, Tam tam

HARP 002-130 Willow Pattern
Philip Harper | Harper Music Publications | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 36,95
WRW6375 Fuego!
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 67,30
JM38042 Sword, Jewel & Mirror
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 92,50
JM46827 Hebridean Lullaby
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 44,20
SM050049128 The Sword, Jewel and Mirror
Philip Harper | Studio Music | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 42,10
WRW6375S Fuego!
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 33,70
SM050049111 The Sword, Jewel and Mirror
Philip Harper | Studio Music | Brass Band | Set of Parts
€ 50,50
No image for this product The opening number in Cory Band's 2015 'Four Elements' themed Brass in Concert programme, this piece sets out a mysterious introduction transporting us back to the time of the Greek Philosophers, after which it presents short musical depictions of Fire, Air, Water and Earth. Designed to start your concert with a bang.
WRW6381 Elemental
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Set (Score & Parts)
€ 67,30
No image for this product The opening number in Cory Band's 2015 'Four Elements' themed Brass in Concert programme, this piece sets out a mysterious introduction transporting us back to the time of the Greek Philosophers, after which it presents short musical depictions of Fire, Air, Water and Earth. Designed to start your concert with a bang.
WRW6381S Elemental
Philip Harper | Wright and Round | Brass Band | Score Only
€ 33,70
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