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Hebe deine Augen auf. Kirchenwerke VII [Bernius]

INSTRUMENT GROUP: Mixed Choir
COMPOSER: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
PUBLISHER: Carus Verlag
PRODUCT TYPE: CD
The CD series featuring the sacred choral music of Felix Mendelssohn in interpretations by the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius makes the entire breadth and variety of Mendelssohn’s church works accessible. The works presented on the new CD „Hebe deine Augen auf“ for a cappella choir or
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Specifications
Instrument Group Mixed Choir
Composer Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Publisher Carus Verlag
Product Type CD
Year of Publication 2006
Style Sacred
No. CV8320600
Description
The CD series featuring the sacred choral music of Felix Mendelssohn in interpretations by the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius makes the entire breadth and variety of Mendelssohn’s church works accessible. The works presented on the new CD „Hebe deine Augen auf“ for a cappella choir or with organ accompaniment range from pieces by the young Felix Mendelssohn for Catholic and Anglican worship to pieces by the mature composer, such as Psalm 100, Jauchzet dem Herrn op. 69,2 [1847]. In the motets for women’s choir op. 39, such as O beata et benedicta for three female voices and organ, Mendelssohn’s sense for the cantabile musical idiom and differentiated harmony isalready evident. Later, these aspects were displayed in such works as the trio for three women’s voices, the unmistakable Hebe deine Augen auf, composed in 1846 for Elijah. For his other great oratorio, Paulus, Mendelssohn had originally planned to include the two Sologesänge op. 112, but in the course of completing that work he changed his mind. The Kammerchor Stuttgart and Frieder Bernius present this selection of Mendelssohn’s works with their accustomed brilliance and clarity.
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